Countdown Clock

Even though I have a smaller countdown clock on my desk and an app on my iPhone I decided to hang one on the wall to countdown my early retirement. I love the big lighted digits. The only ding is that, unlike my smaller clock and my phone app where you enter the date and it counts down to that date, with this unit you must know the number of days and then enter that number in to start the countdown. Other than that it makes me smile when I look up and I can see the light at the end of the tunnel.
I’m seeing review after review where people are saying “it’s so small” The size is clearly stated, besides, while it’s true the case is small, the display is quite large and easy to see, so get over it. The other thing I don’t understand is people keep moaning about the set buttons on the back are unmarked. Come on people. It’s 2017. It’s basicly a clock. It’s just 3 buttons, it’s not that hard to figure out, but to be a nice guy I’m including scans of the documentation so you can always refer back to them here.
Great device and easy to learn. The only reason for not giving 5 stars is the remote. It’s small, hard to read, and doesn’t have a long range. But the clock itself does an excellent job and highly visiable.
As an adult with ADD, I keep my Time Timer at my side throughout the day. It helps me conceptualize time in a way that no other gadget ever has. Using it keeps me on track and on time better than a clock, better than an alarm or stopwatch, better than anything! I love that it makes not one sound except for a tiny beep when the time is up, because that way I can keep it by my computer as I’m working and it doesn’t distract me. If I want to know how much time I have left I might glance at it, but overall I tend to forget it’s there when I’m concentrating on my work–and that’s a good thing. There’s no “ticking”.

Clocks

The apparent position of the Sun in the sky moves over the course of each day, reflecting the rotation of the Earth. Shadows cast by stationary objects move correspondingly, so their positions can be used to indicate the time of day. A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a (usually) flat surface, which has markings that correspond to the hours.[7] Sundials can be horizontal, vertical, or in other orientations. Sundials were widely used in ancient times.[8] With the knowledge of latitude, a well-constructed sundial can measure local solar time with reasonable accuracy, within a minute or two. Sundials continued to be used to monitor the performance of clocks until the modern era.
Many devices can be used to mark passage of time without respect to reference time (time of day, minutes, etc.) and can be useful for measuring duration or intervals. Examples of such duration timers are candle clocks, incense clocks and the hourglass. Both the candle clock and the incense clock work on the same principle wherein the consumption of resources is more or less constant allowing reasonably precise and repeatable estimates of time passages. In the hourglass, fine sand pouring through a tiny hole at a constant rate indicates an arbitrary, predetermined, passage of time. The resource is not consumed but re-used.
Water clocks, also known as clepsydrae (sg: clepsydra), along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments, with the only exceptions being the vertical gnomon and the day counting tally stick.[9] Given their great antiquity, where and when they first existed is not known and perhaps unknowable. The bowl-shaped outflow is the simplest form of a water clock and is known to have existed in Babylon and in Egypt around the 16th century BC. Other regions of the world, including India and China, also have early evidence of water clocks, but the earliest dates are less certain. Some authors, however, write about water clocks appearing as early as 4000 BC in these regions of the world.[10]

Clock

A clock is an instrument used to measure, keep, and indicate time. The clock is one of the oldest human inventions, meeting the need to measure intervals of time shorter than the natural units: the day, the lunar month, and the year. Devices operating on several physical processes have been used over the millennia.
Some predecessors to the modern clock may be considered as “clocks” that are based on movement in nature: A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a flat surface. There is a range of duration timers, a well-known example being the hourglass. Water clocks, along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments. A major advance occurred with the invention of the verge escapement, which made possible the first mechanical clocks around 1300 in Europe, which kept time with oscillating timekeepers like balance wheels.[1][2][3][4]
Traditionally in horology, the term clock was used for a striking clock, while a clock that did not strike the hours audibly was called a timepiece.[5] In general usage today, a “clock” refers to any device for measuring and displaying the time. Watches and other timepieces that can be carried on one’s person are often distinguished from clocks.[6] Spring-driven clocks appeared during the 15th century. During the 15th and 16th centuries, clockmaking flourished. The next development in accuracy occurred after 1656 with the invention of the pendulum clock. A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The electric clock was patented in 1840. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all.
The timekeeping element in every modern clock is a harmonic oscillator, a physical object (resonator) that vibrates or oscillates at a particular frequency.[2] This object can be a pendulum, a tuning fork, a quartz crystal, or the vibration of electrons in atoms as they emit microwaves.
Clocks have different ways of displaying the time. Analog clocks indicate time with a traditional clock face, with moving hands. Digital clocks display a numeric representation of time. Two numbering systems are in use; 24-hour time notation and 12-hour notation. Most digital clocks use electronic mechanisms and LCD, LED, or VFD displays. For the blind and use over telephones, speaking clocks state the time audibly in words. There are also clocks for the blind that have displays that can be read by touch. The study of timekeeping is known as horology.

Atomic Clock

An atomic clock is a clock device that uses an electron transition frequency in the microwave, optical, or ultraviolet region[2] of the electromagnetic spectrum of atoms as a frequency standard for its timekeeping element. Atomic clocks are the most accurate time and frequency standards known, and are used as primary standards for international time distribution services, to control the wave frequency of television broadcasts, and in global navigation satellite systems such as GPS.

The principle of operation of an atomic clock is based on atomic physics; it uses the microwave signal that electrons in atoms emit when they change energy levels. Early atomic clocks were based on masers at room temperature. Currently, the most accurate atomic clocks first cool the atoms to near absolute zero temperature by slowing them with lasers and probing them in atomic fountains in a microwave-filled cavity. An example of this is the NIST-F1 atomic clock, one of the national primary time and frequency standards of the United States.

The accuracy of an atomic clock depends on two factors. The first factor is temperature of the sample atoms—colder atoms move much more slowly, allowing longer probe times. The second factor is the frequency and intrinsic width of the electronic transition. Higher frequencies and narrow lines increase the precision.

National standards agencies in many countries maintain a network of atomic clocks which are intercompared and kept synchronized to an accuracy of 10−9 seconds per day (approximately 1 part in 1014). These clocks collectively define a continuous and stable time scale, the International Atomic Time (TAI). For civil time, another time scale is disseminated, Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). UTC is derived from TAI, but has added leap seconds from UT1, to account for the rotation of the Earth with respect to the solar time.
The idea of using atomic transitions to measure time was suggested by Lord Kelvin in 1879.[3] Magnetic resonance, developed in the 1930s by Isidor Rabi, became the practical method for doing this.[4] In 1945, Rabi first publicly suggested that atomic beam magnetic resonance might be used as the basis of a clock.[5] The first atomic clock was an ammonia absorption line device at 23870.1 MHz built in 1949 at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS, now NIST). It was less accurate than existing quartz clocks, but served to demonstrate the concept.[6] The first accurate atomic clock, a caesium standard based on a certain transition of the caesium-133 atom, was built by Louis Essen and Jack Parry in 1955 at the National Physical Laboratory in the UK.[7][8] Calibration of the caesium standard atomic clock was carried out by the use of the astronomical time scale ephemeris time (ET).[9] This led to the internationally agreed definition of the latest SI second being based on atomic time. Equality of the ET second with the (atomic clock) SI second has been verified to within 1 part in 1010.[10] The SI second thus inherits the effect of decisions by the original designers of the ephemeris time scale, determining the length of the ET second.

Since the beginning of development in the 1950s, atomic clocks have been based on the hyperfine transitions in hydrogen-1, caesium-133, and rubidium-87. The first commercial atomic clock was the Atomichron, manufactured by the National Company. More than 50 were sold between 1956 and 1960. This bulky and expensive instrument was subsequently replaced by much smaller rack-mountable devices, such as the Hewlett-Packard model 5060 caesium frequency standard, released in 1964.

Alarm Clock

Here at the Strategist, we like to think of ourselves as crazy (in the good way) about the stuff we buy (like pillows), but as much as we’d like to, we can’t try everything. Which is why we have People’s Choice, in which we find the best-reviewed (that’s four-to-five-star reviews and lots of ‘em) products and single out the most convincing. While we’ve tried to find the nicest-sounding alarm clocks and ended up with picks for the best alarm clock and a voice-controlled alarm clock, we wanted to see what other ways to wake up were out there. So we found the best alarm clocks on Amazon, according to hyperenthusiastic reviewers. (Note that reviews have been edited for length and clarity.)
Best loud alarm clock
“Great alarm clock for the price. Gigantic numbers for my old eyes. Very basic, easy to set, just what I wanted. Alarm is loud even on low [with] an awful sound that would wake the dead. But that sound makes me get right up, so it does exactly what it’s supposed to do. If you want a soft gentle caress to wake you, get something else, but this is a good alarm and easy to use.”
Best loud alarm clock with vibration
Sonic Alert SBB500SS Sonic Bomb Loud Dual Alarm Clock with Bed Shaker
4.3 stars, 5,800 reviews
“I am the heaviest sleeper and was setting four or five alarms on my phone to wake me up. After being late a few times, I decided to purchase this alarm clock to help me wake up on time. I couldn’t be happier with my purchase. … The bed shaker is super important. I put it under my pillow, and it shook me awake; the loud beep helped too. If you can sleep through earthquakes and shouting family members, this is the alarm clock for you.”
Philips Wake-Up Light Alarm Clock
4.1 stars, 3,922 reviews
“I bought this light because my partner and I need to be up early for work, but our bedroom has very poor natural light. Within a week, I’ve already noticed a difference in my energy levels and mood. The sunrise simulation works perfectly; by the time the ‘alarm’ (peaceful bird noises) goes off, I’m already feeling naturally awake — not groggy or jolted out of my sleep. I feel much more rested, and my average resting heart rate reflects that. I also really love the sunset feature. I wasn’t expecting to get much use out of it, but I feel like it does a great job of helping me settle into bed at the end of the day.”

Online Clock

How to use the online alarm clock
Set the hour and minute for the online alarm clock. The alarm message will appear and the preselected sound will be played at the set time.

When setting the alarm, you can click the “Test” button to preview the alert and check the sound volume.

You can configure the alarm clock appearance (text color, type, and size), and these settings will be saved; they will be used when you open your web browser next time.

The online alarm clock will not work if you close your browser or shut down your computer, but it can work without an internet connection.

You can add links to online alarm clocks with different time settings to your browser’s Favorites. Opening such a link will set the alarm clock to the predefined time.

Doomsday Clock

The Doomsday Clock is a symbol which represents the likelihood of a man-made global catastrophe. Maintained since 1947 by the members of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists’ Science and Security Board,[1] the clock represents an analogy for the threat of global nuclear war. Since 2007, it has also reflected climate change[2] and new developments in the life sciences and technology that could inflict irrevocable harm to humanity.[3]

The clock represents the hypothetical global catastrophe as “midnight” and The Bulletin’s opinion on how close the world is to a global catastrophe as a number of “minutes” to midnight. Its original setting in 1947 was seven minutes to midnight. It has been set backward and forward 23 times since then, the smallest-ever number of minutes to midnight being two (in 1953 and 2018) and the largest seventeen (in 1991). As of January 2018, the clock is set at two minutes to midnight, due to “the looming threats of nuclear war and climate change.”[4][5][6]

The Doomsday Clock’s origin can be traced to the international group of researchers called the Chicago Atomic Scientists, who had participated in the Manhattan Project.[7] After the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, they began publishing a mimeographed newsletter and then the magazine, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, which, since its inception, has depicted the clock on every cover. The clock was first represented in 1947, when The Bulletin co-founder Hyman Goldsmith asked artist Martyl Langsdorf (wife of Manhattan Project research associate and Szilárd petition signatory Alexander Langsdorf, Jr.) to design a cover for the magazine’s June 1947 issue. As Eugene Rabinowitch, another co-founder of The Bulletin, explained later,The Bulletin’s clock is not a gauge to register the ups and downs of the international power struggle; it is intended to reflect basic changes in the level of continuous danger in which mankind lives in the nuclear age…[8]

Langsdorf chose a clock to reflect the urgency of the problem: like a countdown, the clock suggests that destruction will naturally occur unless someone takes action to stop it.[9]In January 2007, designer Michael Bierut, who was on The Bulletin’s Governing Board, redesigned the clock to give it a more modern feel. In 2009, The Bulletin ceased its print edition and became one of the first print publications in the U.S. to become entirely digital; the clock is now found as part of the logo on The Bulletin’s website. Information about the Doomsday Clock Symposium,[10] a timeline of the clock’s settings,[5] and multimedia shows about the clock’s history and culture[11] can also be found on The Bulletin’s website.

The 5th Doomsday Clock Symposium[10] was held on November 14, 2013, in Washington, D.C.; it was a day-long event that was open to the public and featured panelists discussing various issues on the topic “Communicating Catastrophe”. There was also an evening event at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in conjunction with the Hirshhorn’s current exhibit, “Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950”.[12] The panel discussions, held at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, were streamed live from The Bulletin’s website and can still be viewed there.[13] Reflecting international events dangerous to humankind, the clock has been adjusted 22 times since its inception in 1947,[14] when it was set to “seven minutes to midnight”.

Digital Clock

A digital clock is a type of clock that displays the time digitally (i.e. in numerals or other symbols), as opposed to an analog clock, where the time is indicated by the positions of rotating hands.

Digital clocks are often associated with electronic drives, but the “digital” description refers only to the display, not to the drive mechanism. (Both analog and digital clocks can be driven either mechanically or electronically, but “clockwork” mechanisms with digital displays are rare.)
The first digital pocket watch was the invention of Austrian engineer Josef Pallweber who created his “jump-hour” mechanism in 1883. Instead of a conventional dial, the jump-hour featured two windows in an enamel dial, through which the hours and minutes are visible on rotating discs. The second hand remained conventional. By 1885 Pallweber mechanism was already on the market in pocket watches by Cortébert and IWC; arguably contributing to the subsequent rise and commercial success of IWC. The principles of Pallweber jump-hour movement had appeared in wristwatches by the 1920s (Cortébert) and are still used today (Chronoswiss Digiteur). While the original inventor didn’t have a watch brand at the time, his name has since been resurrected by a newly established watch manufacturer.[1]

Plato clocks used a similar idea but a different layout. These spring-wound pieces consisted of a glass cylinder with a column inside, affixed to which were small digital cards with numbers printed on them, which flipped as time passed. The Plato clocks were introduced at the St. Louis World Fair in 1904, produced by Ansonia Clock Company. Eugene Fitch of New York patented the clock design in 1903.[2] 13 years earlier Josef Pallweber had patented the same invention using digital cards (different from his 1885 patent using moving disks) in Germany (DRP No. 54093).[3] The German factory Aktiengesellschaft für Uhrenfabrikation Lenzkirch made such digital clocks in 1893 and 1894.[4]

The earliest patent for a digital alarm clock was registered by D.E Protzmann and others on October 23, 1956, in the United States. Protzmann and his associates also patented another digital clock in 1970, which was said to use a minimal amount of moving parts. Two side-plates held digital numerals between them, while an electric motor and cam gear outside controlled movement.[2]

In 1970, the first digital wristwatch with an LED display was mass-produced. Called the Pulsar, and produced by the Hamilton Watch Company, this watch was hinted at two years prior when the same company created a prototype digital watch for Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey.[5] Throughout the 1970s, despite the initial hefty cost of digital watches, the popularity of said devices steadily rose

Death Clock

Have you ever asked yourself ‘when will I die?’, our advanced life expectancy calculator will accurately* predict your death date for you depending on where you live, how much you smoke and your lifestyle to predict your own death clock.
To predict your death date, simply input your date of birth, sex, smoking habits, your BMI and the country you live in. If you don’t know your BMI simply click the link and our calculator will work out your BMI for you.
The Death Clock is the internet’s friendly reminder that life is slipping away, second by second.

To estimate the amount of seconds you have left to live, the site uses a handful of questions: Date of birth, gender, BMI (body mass index), smoking habits, and general outlook on life — that for some reason are categorized as pessimistic, optimistic, and sadistic. The Death Clock’s calculations are based on a study that estimated the expected number of years lost due to obesity across the lifespan of an adult.

Before finding out the rough date of your funeral, the tool asks for your BMI information emphasizing the dangers of excessive weight gain — as they so eloquently put it “The Lethal Danger of Being Fat.”

Answering the questions honestly, The Death Clock announced my “Personal Day of Death” to happen on Sunday, June 24 2091 — giving me 2,293,545,812 seconds of life (tick tock, tick tock.)

Cuckoo Clock

The Cuckoo Palace is a partner of some of the most renowned cuckoo clock makers in the German Black Forest.

All of our clocks are 100% Original Black Forest Clocks and all our mechanical clockwork cuckoo clocks have the VDS Certificate of Originality.

Please step inside the Cuckoo-Palace and enjoy our large variety of authentic cuckoo clocks and shield clocks with many highly detailed pictures of each clock, comprehensive product descriptions and a growing archive of videos and sounds of our cuckoo clocks.
The most special clocks that are manufactured in the Black Forest have the chance to participate in the annual “Black Forest Clock of the Year” competition. In this competition, the major workshops present their most elaborate model of the year, while a popular vote decides which becomes the “Clock of the Year”.

Usually, the clocks are displayed in a public museum for a while, where the visitors can examine the clocks and choose their favorite. The collection of the Black Forest Clock of the Year is a demonstration of the stunning craftsmanship, design and mechanical engineering that the Black Forest region is known for.

The competition is organized by the Black Forest Clock Association (VdS). This association has seventy members: Manufacturers, supplier and clock dealers. They all have one goal in common: To ensure the high quality standards that one expects from a Black Forest clock. When you purchase a Black Forest clock that comes with the original certificate of the association, you can be sure to have received an authentic piece made in the Black Forest.